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Reads Archiv

Joe Abercrombie
Nene Adams
S.W. Albert
Georgia Beers
Emma Bull
P. Bacigalupi
Kristen Britain
Val Brown
Janneen Brownell
Paulette Callen
Rebecca Cantrell
Gail Carriger
Jung Chang
Tracey Chevalier
Suzanne Collins
Sarah Ettritch
Daniel Everett
James Fennell
Janet Fletcher
Neil Gaiman
Terry Goodkind
Sophia Kell Hagin
C.L. Hart
Gerri Hill
Jim C. Hines
Peter Hopkirk
Isabella
Steven Johnson
Karin Kallmaker
Angela Knight
Anne Laughlin
Laurie J. Marks
Melissa Marr
Robbi McCoy
Gill McKnight
Ann McMan
Allistair Moffat
Winter Pennington
Susan Elizabeth Phillips
Preston/Child
Radclyffe
L.L. Rand
Jack Roberts
Amy Dawson Robertson
C.P. Rowlings
Lisa See
Rachel Spangler
Vicki Stevenson
Lindsey Stone
PJ Trebelhorn
S.L. Viehl
Kate Walker
Yolanda Wallace
J.R. Ward
Dillon Watson
Weebod
Brent Weeks
Kenna White
Windstar and Zee
Jane Yolen
Lara Zielinsky
Markus Zusak

Joe Abercrombie
"The Blade Itself: Book One of the First Law "
Wonderful fantasy story. Great characters. I had to read the sequel and did.

"Before They Are Hanged: Book Two of the First Law"
Again, a great fantasy story. And now… sure, I have to read book three.

Nene Adams
“The Curse of the Jade Dragon”
In the fourth installment in the Gaslight Lady Evangeline St. Claire and her partner, Rhiannon Moore are thrown into the world of the variety theatre and soon find themselves involved in the game of international espionage between Russia and Britain. I love Nene Adams’ writing and can only guess how much research she puts into her stories. The author's description of time and society is very well done, the mystery is interesting and Lady St. Claire and Rhiannon Moore make a most interesting couple. Again, Nene Adams makes it very clear that life for women, in a time when society was shaped through strict rules was not easy at all.
“The Curse of the Jade Dragon” is another brilliant book from a wonderful writer.

S.W. Albert
“Thyme of death”
I didn’t even bother to finish that one

Georgia Beers
"Starting from Scratch"
This book is written in 1st person point of view - something I usually don't like to read. I still believe that this story could have been even better if Georgia Beers would have allowed Elena to show us more of herself as well. I really would have liked to get to know her better. Anyhow, it is a good story that I thoroughly enjoyed. It's a fun read and something I desperately needed on a day when everything had been going down the drain - again. I think I'm even going to re-read this one sometime in the future. This story is the equivalent to soul food- in the best possible way.

Emma Bull
“War for the Oaks”
This one was first published in 1987. For years I heard that I just have to read it. Well, now I did. And tell you what: if you’re into urban fantasy and didn’t have a chance to read “War for the Oaks” – what are you still waiting for? Despite its age, this is one of the best urban fantasy books I’ve read so far. And I read a lot. .

P. Bacigalupi
“The Windup Girl”
This book is as hard to review as it is to get into. At least for me. One of the reasons may be that I hardly ever read science-fiction. It's simply not my genre. But when I stumbled across an excerpt of 'The Windup Girl' and read the reviews - well, I simply needed to read it myself. And I'm happy that I did.
It's a dark story, set into a dark world. A world of corporate domination, controlled by 'calorie companies'. A world shattered from worldwide epidemics and famine. A world where global warming has raised the sea levels and carbon fuel sources are nearly gone.
It seems to be a world without much hope and yet - as long as humans exist, there will be hope or at least a struggle to survive. And sometimes the same goes for non-humans.
Paolo Bacigalupi paints a disturbingly plausible future. Maybe someone will pick up a copy of this story in two hundred years and marvel about the author's foresight. And maybe everything will turn out differently.
Still, Paolo Bacigalupi wrote an engaging story with multi-layered characters that is well worth the effort to get into, even for those that usually don't read science-fiction. I'm happy that I did. It's a book well worth reading.

Kristen Britain
„The High King’s Tomb“
Another fantasy series that I simply adore. I can’t wait for the next book coming out in spring 2011.

Val Brown
“In the works”
What is it with us Germans suddenly showing up in lesfic books? Or is this just a coincidence? However, “In the works” is a good read. I enjoyed it and it was funny to read a few German words or sentences once in a while.

Janneen Brownell
“Obsessions”
Another online story that I stumbled over by accident. I found it a bit tough to get into – too many people and names at the beginning.But that could as well be my problem. However, the writing was good and I plan to read another of her stories.

Paulette Callen
“Command of Silence”
This is absolutely the best book I’ve read in the past months. I can't give enough praise here. The crime part was all right, though I guessed pretty early on what happened. What really threw me in the best possible way is the heroine's uniqueness. Shiloh is brave, intelligent, and has Multiple Personality Disorder. Paulette Callen managed to write Shiloh and her alter egos in a way that makes me want to take my hat off to her.
The author’s first book “Charity” was great. I bought it second hand some years ago.
But “Command of Silence” is simply one of those rare gems out there.

Rebecca Cantrell
“A trace of smoke”
Rebecca Cantrell's debut novel takes place in pre-war Berlin, 1931. The Nazi's are growing more and more powerful with each passing day and for some people it was already foreseeable what would happen in the near future. Throw a female crime reporter, her dead (gay) brother and a young, parentless boy into the story and inhale the pleasant smell of a promising book. I was really looking forward to reading the story - and wasn't totally disappointed. The author paints a modestly accurate picture of the time and gives us some nice details of everyday life. The plot is interesting, even though it was pretty easy to guess what was going on with little Anton. However, what really bothered me was the author's inability to transport emotions. And no, having your heroine cry every twenty or so pages doesn't count.

Gail Carriger
"Soulless"
Now, that one was a surprise! This new series features "Alexia Tarabotti", an old spinster. Alexia is a "preternatural". Never heard about one of those? Whenever Alexia touches someone supernatural the person turns human again – but only as long as Alexia’s touch lasts. She’s soulless and a danger to every supernatural being, eh person, or whatever.
This is a fun read, full of werewolves, vampires and Victorian London.
I’m really looking forward to "Changeless", the next book in this series.

Jung Chang
“Wild Swans”
696 pages of Chinese history, of heartbreak, of politics and thankfulness on my side that I didn’t have to experience any of that. Wow. What a tough time and what a marvellous book.
Seems to be my Asian reading months. First “Snow Flower and the Secret Fan”, then “Foreign Devils on the Silk Road”, now this book. The story of how three generations of women in her family fared in the political maelstrom of China during the 20th century is a very interesting, captivating and sometimes depressing read. I had to take some breaks while reading it. And once again I became aware of how little I know about so many things and how lucky I am to be born in a democracy.

Tracey Chevalier
“Remarkable Creatures”
Tracy Chevalier's new story introduces us to the world of and strange friendship between Mary Annings and Elizabeth Philpot. While Elizabeth and her two sister had to leave London, condemned to a live of spinsterhood, Mary Annings, who can neither read nor write, has to prevent her family to be condemned to the workhouse. She's successful because of her gift of finding fossils on the beaches of the English coast around Lyme.
In fact, Mary Annings was the first person ever to find a complete pterosaurus, as well as a squaloraja (a transition animal between sharks and rays).
Tracy Chevalier is a wonderful writer and shows us how much both women had to suffer through the conventions of her time. Men didn't take them seriously, didn't even notice them and took credit for the fossils Marry Annings discovered. Nevertheless both women found their own way in their own time.
The uncommon friendship between these two women and the intelligent and easy way in which Tracy Chevalier presents the scientific and religious frictions of 19th century make for a remarkable read.
This book is one of the best I read this year. Don't look any further if you're looking for some good entertainment mixed with interesting history. .

Suzanne Collins
„Hunger Games“
All right – that one’s for teenagers but don’t let that keep you from reading it. I was barely able to put it down once I started. Katnis is a wonderful heroine, able to face whatever is thrown her way once the ‘Hunger Games’ start. Besides having to face a lot of adventures, she struggles an internal fight of how to win without having to kill one of the other teenagers forced into the game. Truth is – she can’t. But that is all I’m going to say…

Sarah Ettritch
“The Salbine Sisters”
I really enjoyed this one. Sarah Ettritch created an interesting world and two very likeable heroines. The dynamic between Maddy and Lillian is captivating and often enough really funny. These two are so different that they are a perfect fit for each other.
Emmey, the pickpocket is a nice addition to the story.
The focus on the character development is a big bonus from my point of view. Y
The world building is well done and well thought through.
Honestly, once started I couldn't put the book down. This one is a keeper.
Well done, Sarah Ettritch. And pretty please: I want to read more about Maddy and Lillian. .

Daniel Everett
“Don’t sleep, there are snakes”
The author describes his experience as a missionary with the Amazonian Piraha tribe. I was especially interested in this book because of an article I read in a German newspaper. They stated that the author doesn’t believe in God anymore because he met the happiest people alive in the non-Christian Pirahas. Well, turned out that this isn’t what the books was about. However, it was an interesting read.

Janet Fletcher
„Wolfsbane Winter“
I've read all of Jane Fletcher's books and though the others were good, I believe this one to be her best so far. I guess this has to do with me being a sucker for good character development. And even though this book has only 264 pages the author does a pretty good job in that area.
Deryn and Alana are characters you like to get to know. Both are down to earth, grown up women. Which is more than most lesfic books I read this year presented me with.
Also, I liked the plot. The book has a good mixture of both romance and fantasy.
For all those looking for a good read - go for it. You won't regret buying this book.
And it doesn't hurt that this one feels like the start of a new series.

James Fennell
"Vanishing Ireland"
Those two books are absolutely brilliant. James Fennel and Turtle Bunbury take their readers on a journey into Ireland's past. The portraits from men and woman (the oldest over a hundred years old) that have lived a sometimes not so easy life are inspiring and open a window into a nearly vanished world. The photographs are beautiful and inspiring as well. For all those interested in Ireland those are must have books.

Neil Gaiman
“American Gods”
How I wished I would have never touched it. So far I loved everything from Neil Gaiman. “Neverwhere” – absolutely amazing. “The graveyard book” – even my partner who isn’t really into reading enjoyed it. “Stardust” – yeah, the movie was a bit better but still, good book. “American Gods” – what shall I say. I forced myself to read over 100 pages and was still wondering what the point is. Sorry, Neil – that one just wasn’t it for me.

Terry Goodkind
"Wizard’s First Rule"
Wow! I really liked that one. I’m not sure if I’m up to the sequel anytime soon – another 992 pages… It will probably have to wait until autumn 2010 as epic fantasies are reading material for cold and dark autumn or winter nights.

Sophia Kell Hagin
„Whatever Gods may be“
This one was tough to get into because of all the military jargon. But the story is worth the perseverance needed to finish it.
Though beware: This is neither a light read nor a romance. Not at all. The cruelty of war is portrayed rather explicitly. There are even some torture scenes.
Still, Jamie Gwynmorgan's story kept me captivated. Enlisting in the army with age 17 she soon finds herself in the middle of a war and faces death nearly every day.
The author does a got job portraying her.
This is a book for those looking for a captivating read, which isn't a romance. And for those that can stomach the reality of war.

C.L. Hart
“From a distance”
Not a bad book but not my piece of cake. Sorry.

Gerri Hill
“Love Waits”
Finally a new one by Gerri Hill. I liked that one better than “The Scorpion” and will keep it.

“The Scorpion”
Good, solid book. Surely not her best one (my favourite is still “Artist Dreams”) – but worth reading anyhow.

“The Rainbow Cedar”
All right for a few hours of entertainment. But definitely not her best book.

Jim C. Hines
„Red Hood’s Revenge“
Now, this series keeps getting better and better. I love his writing style and – honestly – a mainstream fantasy book with a likeable lesbian heroine that so far hasn’t been killed, killed herself, or turned out to be a lunatic...

Peter Hopkirk
“Foreign Devils on the Silk Road”
Very interesting read for everyone interested in history. It reads a bit like an Indiana Jones movie – but in a good way.

Isabella
“Always faithful”
This is one of those books I really wanted to like. Honestly. Unfortunately I can't recommend it. The writing is average, the characters are rather cliché and the editing didn't really happen. For those interested in a story that takes place in the military (DADT is the major theme here) and willing to overlook some major flaws, this book could still be worth the read. .

Steven Johnson
"The Ghost Map"
The subtitle says it all: "The story of London’s most terrifying epidemic – and how it changed science, cities, and the modern world." Very interesting read.
I guess the people that watched me read this book on the train enjoyed it as well, as I couldn’t help but make "Yuck"-face expressions every so often.

Karin Kallmaker
“Stepping Stone”
Ugh… maybe I shouldn’t have read this one right after finishing “The Cabinet of Curiosities”. Sorry, Karin, I couldn’t get into it.

Angela Knight
“Passionate Ink”
I had high hopes for this one. Erotic romance is something I do enjoy to read and I want to learn how to write it – however, I should have remembered that I once read an erotic romance from Angela Knight. I didn’t even finish it and forgot all about it.
Sorry, I cannot recommend “Passionate Ink” for those who want to learn how to write good erotic romances.

Anne Laughlin
"Veritas"
After reading "Sometimes quickly" several months ago I wasn’t so sure if I wanted to try a second book written by Anne Laughlin. In the end I did and "Veritas" surprised me.
There’s lot of intrigue, college politic, there’s murder, and there are two women who are drawn to each other. Overall, this isn’t so much a romance than a mystery book. But the romance doesn’t hurt.
The main characters are interesting and Anne Laughlin gives them some time to develop. The latter is something which I don’t take for granted anymore in lesbian fiction.
Though the portrayal of one character annoyed the hell out of me. Mel, the female mechanic is a living cliché. She’s the butch blue collar lesbian who’s sleeping with every woman (gay or straight). She’s not very clever, tough on the outside but really has a heart of gold. Sorry, but she’s a bit too much…
‘Veritas’ won’t be a permanent addition to my bookshelf but it is an entertaining read for those looking for a few hours of diversion.

Laurie J. Marks
“Fire Logic”
Wonderful fantasy story. I need the sequel. Desperately.

Melissa Marr
„Ink Exchange“
Ink Exchange is the second instalment in the 'Wicked Lovely' series and unfortunately can't hold the quality writing of the first book. I found it hard to even finish reading it. Which is a shame cause I really liked the darker and no happily ever after of this book. 'Ink Exchange' is as close to reality as a book about faeries will probably ever be.
Leslie, the protagonist of 'Ink Exchange' is a friend of Aislinn's, the new summer queen. And Leslie is more of a dark character because of everything that happened to her before she even met the faeries or got to know about their existence. The first half of the book is great. Melissa Marr takes her time to introduce us to the character of Leslie and Irial, who is the king of the Dark Court. I found it easy to like Leslie and feel for her. The world building is well done, the description of the faeries and the whole atmosphere is great.
The second half of the book looses quality. Everything seems rushed and the developing love triangle more than a bit forced. On top of it Melissa Marr leaves the reader wondering. Surely this can't be the ending of Leslie's story. Unfortunately - because the second half of the book wasn't really a page-turner - I'm not sure if I want to buy the next installment of the series to see if there is more about Leslie.
I give the book three stars because of the well-done world building and the first 180 or so pages.

“Wicked Lovely”
I really enjoyed this one. And honestly, what's not to like if you have a thing for urban fantasy and especially for faeries?
Melissa Marr's faerie world is far from peachy. This book isn't about gossamer-winged flower beings, all lovely and painted in pastel-colors. Her faeries aren't all nice and light and the author sometimes more than hints at the physical cruelty in their world.
This first book in the series centers on the fight between the Winter Queen and the Summer King, her son. The main heroine is Aislinn, a human girl with the Sight (the ability to see faeries). She's the Summer Queen - the one Keenan, the Summer King, has been searching for centuries. Keenan's mother doesn't want him to find his Queen since this would mean the end of her own reign or at least limit her own powers.
And Aislinn isn't very keen of becoming the Summer Queen either. She's in love with Seth, a human, and doesn't like faeries.
My favorite person in this story is Donia, the Winter Girl. She's a former lover of Keenan and her story is really heart-breaking.
The plot of `Wicked Lovely' is interesting enough to keep one reading. But I'm especially fond of the world building. The author put a lot of effort into creating the different faerie courts and beings. She takes the old faerie stories and crafts an interesting and complex world that goes beyond most of what I read over the past months.
Book two of this series, `Ink Exchange' is already sitting on my shelf and waiting to be read.

Robbi McCoy
"Something to believe"
There are stories that are just right for a few hours of entertainment. I enjoy those. I really do.
And then there are stories like 'Something to believe'. They touch me somewhere deep inside and won't allow me to forget about their characters for a long time.
Robbi Mccoy managed to pull me into the story from page one on.
Faith, Lauren and Cassie are charming, interesting, and witty. Neither of them is the bad girl in this story. They are believable and (in the very best way) ordinary characters. People you'd like to get to know and spend some time with.
On top of everything else, Robbi Mccoy has done her research about China's history and the whole anthropology background. For me this was a big bonus point.
'Something to believe' is a complex story and not the average romance.
It's a beautiful story that I simply loved.

Gill McKnight
“Ambereye”
That one hit the spot. This is my kind of humour and I really like a good werewolf story – who would have guessed. “Goldenseal” was okay.
“Ambereye” is really worth reading.

Ann McMan
"Jericho"
Teaser: Librarian Syd Murphy flees the carnage of a failed marriage by accepting an 18-month position in Jericho, a small town located in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia. Intending to hide out and heal her wounds, she soon becomes drawn into the daily lives of a quirky cast of local characters and she becomes fast friends with Maddie Stevenson, the enigmatic local physician who has returned to the backcountry community to take over her late father's medical practice.
Now, I haven't read any online uber stories for quite some time. And then I stumbled across this story. And thoroughly enjoyed it. Great characters, witty dialogue and yep - character building. I love it when authors take their time with their characters.
You can find "Jericho" at The Athenaeum or the Academy of Bards. Go, read it and enjoy.

Allistair Moffat
“Sea Kingdoms”
Not an easy read but not as difficult as “Arthur and the lost kingdoms.” I guess I have to read it again sometime – there’s just too much information for one session. .

“Arthur and the Lost Kingdom”
Wow. This isn’t an easy read – especially compared to Moffat’s “Before Scotland” which I read last year. Brilliant book by the way. “Arthur and the Lost Kingdom” is full of information about the local area in lowland Scotland where the author grew up. Especially his explanations about changing place names in history are interesting – but also a bit dry. I’d say that one really has to love the subject to enjoy the book.

Winter Pennington
“Witch Wolf”
Not bad at all. The writing style reminded my a lot of Laurell K. Hamilton's Anita Blake books - and not in a bad way. As a matter of fact, I have to read the next installment sometime soon.
For all those looking for an engaging read in the urban fantasy genre - this is the book.

Susan Elizabeth Phillips
“First Lady”
Books like this one are usually absolutely not my piece of cake. I prefer fantasy above all, maybe a bit of science-fiction and might even be persuaded to read a good thriller from time to time. Hetero-romance? No, thanks.
But somehow I got my hands on this book and what shall I say? It was a funny feel good read. The story took my mind off real life, which at the moment is something I really appreciate.
I haven't read anything else from this author before and can't judge if this is one of her better books or not. Still, I find the idea of a hero who raised seven sisters and whose masculinity is based on the wish to escape that female overdose in his life utterly funny. Cornelia, the first lady, who wanted to escape the overbearing white house life, is written believable enough for me. And hey, I especially liked Lucy, the teenager from hell... who in the end turns out to be nothing more than a teenager looking for some real love.
Is the story believable? No. Is it good? I don't know. Did I like it? Absolutely.
Parts of the story nearly made me laugh out loud on the train.
So, for everyone looking for a story that might help escape real life for some hours. Well, have a go at it.

Preston/Child
“Dance of Death”
Yes. I love Agent Pendergast and can’t get enough of him. .

“The book of the dead”
Even better than “Dance of the Death.” .

“Reliquary”
All right. I admit it – I’m a sucker for stories like these. What isn’t there to be loved? History, crime, strong female (co)-leads. This is a page turner – again. Though I have to admit that the villain didn’t convince me a 100%. But it still is a good book.

“Cabinet of Curiosities”
This is the eighth book from the dynamic duo – and I really liked it. They have a way of keeping me from sleep that I don’t want to miss out on. Their heroes aren’t flawless (except Agent Pendergast – some kind of modern Sherlock Holmes), their heroines are strong and stubborn (I love that) and the story is interesting, to say the least.

Radclyffe
“Secrets in the Stone”
Radclyffe is a great author – no question. But this book seemed to me like a writing exercise with the following task: create great atmosphere and don’t care so much about the plot.
I still enjoyed it but didn’t keep it on my shelf.

“Night Call”
Not as good as “Fated Love”. Nice read, though.

“Fated Love”
I had so many people telling me that this was their favourite story from Radclyffe that I finally had to read it myself. And yes – this one is a keeper. Very nice story. In fact, I just ordered “Night Call”. I have to know what happens to Quinn and Honor.

L.L. Rand
“The Midnight Hunt”
I'm a sucker for well written urban fantasy and yet I hesitated to pick up Radclyffe's book. Partly because of the negative reviews, partly because of what I heard from friends who read 'The Midnight Hunt'. And then there's the erotica aspect of the story. I read erotic urban fantasy in the past and never really liked it. Too much erotica - not enough love. Well, now I've done it anyhow. It took my two days to read the book and I enjoyed it. Still, I understand those who didn't.
'The Midnight Hunt' is the first book in a series and therefore has to give some background information that at times stops the flow of the story. Still, so far the world building is well done. It remains to be seen how it will hold up in future books.
I cannot understand why readers complain about the lack of plot. The plot is there, it's obvious and interesting, only not very surprising.
The one thing I found lacking is the character development which is quite often the big downside in erotic urban fantasy. There's always too much sex and not enough character building. And it really is a shame with the cast of interesting characters Radclyffe introduces us to. I wanted to know more about Drake. The author only hints at her interesting past. To have someone with a foster care background joining a pack of werewolves - great idea and wasted (amazing) potential for character development and conflict.
The same goes for love versus erotica. This book is pure erotic fantasy. The characters fall in lust with each other, not in love. At least not my description of love. They know hardly anything about each other but know that they will spend their whole life together. They have lots of hot, steamy sex and know that they can't live with each other. Erotica in its purest form.
Despite everything I found that I cared about the characters and that I want to know how their story continues. There aren't so many good lesbian fantasy books out there, much less urban fantasy ones. Overall I enjoyed this book and I'm looking forward to 'Blood Hunt', the next installment in this series.

Jack Roberts
"Sheele-na-Gigs of Ireland and Britain"
This one I actually re-read. During a vacation in Ireland I stumbled across this book. And it was the first time I ever heard about Sheela-na-Gigs. Rediscovered around 160 years ago they are still a mystery. But whatever they are - they are most certainly fascinating. Alone in Ireland there are over 110 of those carvings scattered across the country. But not only in Ireland. You can find them in England, Scotland, Wales, Denmark, Germany, France and Norway. They can be found on castles and in museums. But the majority of these figures occur in small country churches; the oldest of them dating around 1200 AD.
This book is an easy and most interesting read and puts forward some interesting theories on the figures' origins. The end of the book has a catalogue of the Sheela-na-Gigs so far discovered in England, Ireland, Wales & Scotland.'Sheela-na-Gigs of Ireland and Britain' is a good starting point to get introduced to a most interesting subject.

Amy Dawson Robertson
“Mile to go”
Nice read for some hours of entertainment. But honestly, I can’t remember that I ever read a book with that many point of views. I found that a bit irritating – especially with so many people getting killed after being just introduced with their own point of view.

C.P. Rowlings
„Collision Course”
A really good, rather serious romance book. Actually, one of the best I read in 2010 so far.

Lisa See
“Flower Net” and “The Interior”
I don’t know why but somehow I seem to be attracted to books that are connected to China. It started with Lisa See’s “Snow Flower and the secret fan”. A book that one of my favourite authors pointed out to be one of her favourite books. However, “Flower Net” and “The Interior” are well worth a read… even though they have some weak parts. Still, Lisa See packs so much information about China into these books without boring me. So, here you go.

“Snow Flower and the Secret Fan”
I can hardly remember when a book has touched me as deeply as 'Snow Flower and the Secret Fan'. I finished the book with tears in my eyes. Lisa See wrote a remarkable book about China, about friendship, about 'nu-shu' (a writing system exclusively used among women), about the world of women (talk about bound feet) that revolved around the 'inner room' while man lived in the 'outer room' and about life. This book is a keeper. Nothing describes it better than the words „achingly beautiful“.

Rachel Spangler
„Learning Curve“
I’ve never read a book from Rachel Spangler before. This was a nice read. I really liked the butch/femme dynamic and will keep the book. Some stories are the equivalent of soul food and are there to be read when all one needs is a good story to make one feel better.
Don’t you agree?

Vicki Stevenson
“Family Affairs”
I do not want to talk about this book. Sorry. But not everything should be published.

Lindsey Stone
“Awakening to sunlight”
Sorry, not my kind of story. I didn’t even finish it. Too much telling, not enough showing.

PJ Trebelhorn
“From this moment on”
I had a hard time finishing that one. Sorry – not my piece of cake.

S.L. Viehl
“Stardoc”
A Science Fiction book – wow. I love watching SF movies, I really do. I’m not into reading the books. But “Stardoc” sounded really interesting and I always wanted to read something from S.L. Viehl (besides her blog). And surprise, surprise – I loved it. But honestly – it could as well be urban fantasy, only that you don’t have vampires or werewolves hanging around but instead aliens. Very nice story and an interesting heroine. Good one.

Kate Walker
“12 Point Guide to Writing Romance”
This is a good guide for writing romance. I enjoyed reading it and hope that I learned a few things.

Yolanda Wallace
“Rum Spring”
Thank you BSB for taking a chance with that one. I have a thing for the Amish ever since I watched ‘Witness’ with Harrison Ford – and I didn’t only watch the movie once.
Rum Spring refers to a period for the Amish that begins around the age of sixteen and ends when a youth chooses baptism within the Amish church or instead leaves the community. In “Rum Spring” Yolanda Wallace takes us on a journey with Rebecca (Amish) and Dylan (English), two girls who fall in love with each other. Both know that theirs is a forbidden love.
I enjoyed the empathetic writing and the well-done character development. The book was a bit short for my liking. The story covers the span of several years and sometimes it feels a bit rushed. Still, this one is worth the read. .

J.R. Ward
"Lover avenged"
I love her writing style. I really do. This is the seventh book in this series and I read them all. Not all of them are equally good but "Lover avenged" is a great read. Especially one side character (Xhex) held my interest and the next book seems to be about her and John. Ah, it’s such a shame that John isn’t a Jane. That would be even more fun

Dillon Watson
“Keile’s Chance”
I couldn’t get into it and stopped reading when I was halfway through.

Weebod
“The player”
I haven’t come around to read a lot of online stories lately but thanks to a disgusting stomach flue I finally found some time – or it found me. However, even if you’re not into field hockey (I’m a bit since my partner played it for years) you’ll enjoy that story. It certainly doesn’t hurt that it plays in Edinburgh.

Brent Weeks
“The Way of Shadows”
Didn’t finish this one. I found it completely boring.

Kenna White
“Romancing the Zone”
I like books where the heroines aren’t 20 and fit to work as a model. Good story, nice entertainment.

Windstar and Zee
“Zoya”
Windstar and Zee definitely belong to my favourite group of authors. I love their wits, their portrayal of not so perfect heroines and their story lines. I should really drop them a line and let them know. Anyhow, this is another great story and I can’t wait for the next one. Hurry up you two.

Jane Yolen
"Briar Rose"
I wasn't sure what to expect when I started reading this story. But wow - what a strong story this is. It's not only a 'simple' retelling of Sleeping Beauty.
Becca's grandmother Gemma is obsessed with the story of Briar Rose (one of the many names of the old fairy tale 'Sleeping Beauty'). When Gemma dies Becca starts on a journey to find out about her grandmother's past. And finding out she does....
This isn't only a story for young adults. Though it is written in a quiet simplistic language.
Jane Yolen managed to create a captivating, believable story around the Polish Holocaust that is still with me several days after reading it.

Lara Zielinsky
“Turn for Home”
This is the sequel to “Turning Point”, published in 2007. I found “Turning Point” to be an okay read and liked the sequel a lot better.

Markus Zusak
“The Book Thief”
The book sold over 400,000 copies. I’m glad that I borrowed mine from my parents in law. I didn’t even finish it.

 
 


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